Thursday, May 04, 2006

Beer and Prison Spaces

I guess Carolyn Bennett just removed herself from the first round in the Liberal Party leadership race [Toronto Star, Child-care battle rages]:
"There's actually no plan for early learning and child-care spaces. So it's a good job they're putting more money for prisons in the budget because we're going to need them if we don't get this early childhood right."
Now, I support structured day care as an option for parents. I think a structured day care as an extension of the public school system (expanded nursery and kindergarten programs) is a good thing and something I would support whole-heartedly. I see the early exposure this has on my eldest, and I'm pleased with it. Plus, this model sates my conservative leanings - there's no new bureaucracy, no new black hole money pits created - just public schools with early childhood educators working with younger children in a school environment. Perfect.

At the same time, parents are fully qualified to raise their children. To suggest otherwise is almost political suicide.

I'd like to think this was just a partisan attack on the budget, and surely that Dr. Bennett doesn't truly believe her own rhetoric.

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12 comments:

Joanne (True Blue) said...

I sure wouldn't want her to be my doctor!

x2para said...

What is this idiot a doctor of anyway, buffoonery?

non-criminal raised by mom said...

From Macleans:

http://www.macleans.ca/topstories/health/article.jsp?content=20060503_144917_4472

A Quebec pediatrician has stirred a heated public debate in that province over the impact day care has on the development of very young children by suggesting it can lead to behaviour problems.
"It's best for a child to be with its biological parents as much as possible during the first 24 months of life," but parents routinely "parachute" their children into day care at too young an age, says Dr. Jean-Francois Chicoine, a pediatrician at Sainte-Justine Hospital in Montreal.

TangoJuliette said...

"...There's actually no plan for early learning and child-care spaces. So it's a good job they're putting more money for prisons in the budget because we're going to need them if we don't get this early childhood right!..." ~ Doctor Carolyn Bennett ~ 2May2006



Certainly, after countless centuries, millenniae, of parental upbringing around the globe, Bennett's ass-ertions and innuendoes are substantiated by the world-wide emergence of the thousands of societies whose citizens and leaders are all reprobates and deviants who,in contrast merely make Dutch Shultz, Myer Lansky, Al Capone, the gentle folk at Murder, Inc., Pol Pot and J. Stalin all look like poster boys for your local Sunday School Association.

Therefore, it is the humble estimation of the Directors and Members of the Academy that the above quote be declared this week's winner of the "Over The Top Fearmongering and Fearsome Frothing & Foaming-at-theMouth Bizarre Blatherings and Idiotic Inanities" Award. Futhermore, in recognition of her glorious achivement, The Good Doctor, winsome Carolyn Bennett, is henceforth entitled to the Official Academy Award Designation:

Carolynn "QUACKIE" BENNETT

Well done Doc. Well said, dear wacky "Quackie!!" You must gotten top marks in "paeds."

Old Jute said...

If Dr. Bennett feels that taxpayer-funded daycare is critical to our society's success (perhaps a valid argument), then maybe she should lobby the provincial governments to provide it. Where and when did provisioning of daycare become a federal responsibility? Should the feds take over running hospitals and schools too?

This whole debate comes down to the fiscal imbalance. If the feds didn't have the surpluses, we wouldn't even be discussing it.

If she feels so strongly about it, she should be storming Queen's Park demanding that Dalton McGuinty raise taxes from the (rich) citizens of Ontario and that he provide daycare spaces forthwith.

Fat chance. It comes down to this: the daycare zealots want taxpayer-funded daycare, and they want Alberta to pay for it.

Scott Tribe said...

Claiming people who want a universal daycare system want it so we can shoulder Alberta with the load is more ridiculous then Bennett's statement.

Face it - rhetoric aside.. this is a battle between those who want Universal DayCare and those who want the free market to decide. Its becoming increasingly obvious that the Tories and most of their supporters would wipe out Universal Health-Care in this country as well, if it werent already so established and taken as a given by every single Canadian. It would be political suicide to be perceived as wanting to do that.

With child-care, the Tories are trying desperately to prevent that type of universally accepted system from taking root on that front. If the Liberals would learn to tone down their rhetoric and make those points in a more reasonable manner, they wouldnt give the Tories and their acolytes "red herring" ammo to distract from that issue.

Even with that, the public is having a hard time believing Harper's plan will help anyone. As Jeffery Simpson says, 2-4$ a day is supposed to give families "choice" on childcare?

Please.

Jim said...

With child-care, the Tories are trying desperately to prevent that type of universally accepted system from taking root on that front. If the Liberals would learn to tone down their rhetoric and make those points in a more reasonable manner, they wouldnt give the Tories and their acolytes "red herring" ammo to distract from that issue.

With all due respect, as far as I can see, the only objection is the federal government getting involved in the child care project. That's my objection. The Ontario Liberals (and the provincial Tories too) are still planning on creating those spaces, and I support it.

As it happens, the federal government over the last few years has been flush with cash and sharing it with the provinces to direct towards provincial priorities is a good thing. If, as Ontario does, see the benefits of a day care program, then Ontario is free to create it. If another province sees benefits in creating a different program, so be it. Stephen Harper gets it, Dalton McGuinty gets it, why can't Carolyn Bennett get it?

And, this is the second time a Liberal has said something bone-headed. Once is an anomaly, twice is a school of thought.

Jim said...

Just for the record, I'm not a big fan of the new child care allowance, either. It's not really going to change much for me ... money could have likely been spent elsewhere.

I'll still take it, sure ... :D

Anthony said...

I'm not defending Bennett, but the article quote said:

"There's actually no plan for early learning and child-care spaces. So it's a good job they're putting more money for prisons in the budget because we're going to need them if we don't get this early childhood right." Moments later she clarified she meant "early learning."

She did correct herself "moments later", whatever that means.

Old Jute said...

Scott - Why do you believe daycare is a federal responsibility? My children were born in an Ontario hospital. They now attend Ontario junior kindergarten and a senior kindergarten. These services are designed and administered by the Ontario government. The feds kick some money into health care (to the have-not provinces) basically nothing into primary education.

By what leap of logic do you claim that the federal government is remiss in not developing a detailed plan for services over which it has no responsibility? Should the feds develop a detailed plan to fix potholes in front of your house?

Scott Tribe said...

Jute:

Very simple - I believe that publicly funded child care is (or should be) a universal right, like public education and medicare.

Martin's plan was only barely adequate... but it should have gone farther with national standards for across the country.

Da Zing said...

"I believe that publicly funded child care is (or should be) a universal right"

Me too. I think that parents should have the right to receive public support to care for their children in whatever way they see fit.

I'm glad we can agree on something.

Seriously though, I have a hard time, myself, seeing that daycare is a universal right. Unlike education and healthcare, there is no long term net benefit to having all children in day care. I know the kids have fun in day care, but they also have fun eating ice cream. I don't think even you would propose that ice cream is a universal right.

Of course, you can point to low income families who very likely can't afford day care. But most problems that children of these families might face have more to do with low income than what they missed out on in day care. And again, I doubt that a universal day care program would provide a significant long term net benefit. There were a lot of fights between my parents when I was growing up, and they were usually about money, either directly or indirectly. A universal day care program would have done nothing to help that. You could have put me in day care, but my parents would still have had no money, and I would still have been home in time for the fights.

And, by the way, I am now nearing the end of a Ph.D. in mathematics, so clearly, even though I grew up in a poor family and I didn't go to day care, it didn't make me criminally stupid, or even benignly stupid.

That being said, I would support a day care program targetted towards low income families, and especially single parent families. I know that such a system is already in place, but it is flawed. I think our political energies would put to better use trying to fix that system.

By the way, your answer does not actually address Jute's question. You can believe it is (or should be) a universal right all you want, but why is it the fed's responsibility, beyond the equalization program?